Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Pajama Storytime: Ducks!

Where is Thumbkin?

Dooby Dooby Moo by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Betsy Lewin. I just love all the singing that happens in this one. It's a really fun one to read, especially if you can get the kids to sing along with you, and all the adults LOVE it when you do "Born to be Wild" with quacking noises.

Hickory Dickory Dock

Way up high in the apple tree (raise hands above head)
Two red apples did I see (make hands into fists)
I shook that tree as hard as a could (wave fists wildly about above your head)
And down came the apples (crash hands into lap)
And mmmmmmm. They were good (make yummy motions on your tummy)

10 Little Rubber Ducks by Eric Carle. Fun adventure/counting book about rubber ducks that fall off a container ship and where they end up. I mention that it was inspired by some real rubber ducks that fell off a container ship and by studying where they ended up, scientists used them to learn a lot about ocean currents and patterns. (You can read a lot more about that in Tracking Trash by Loree Griffin Burns.

Shake My Sillies Out (marking the Pajama Time debut of my ukelele!)

5 Little Ducks. (Over storytime break, I finally made a flannel board for this one, but storytime was in a temporary odd location this time and getting the actual flannel board there was more than I wanted to deal with. So I played my uke!)

Farmer Duck by Martin Waddell, illustrated by Helen Oxenbury. I love this story about the farmer who stays in bed all day and makes that duck do all the work. The kids also catch on pretty quickly to the repetitive nature and can say it along with you, which is always fun!


to the tune of "If You're Happy and You Know It"
If you're sleepy and you know it great big yawn!
If you're sleepy and you know it great big yawn!
If you're sleepy and you know it and it's really time to show it,
If you're sleepy and you know it great big yawn!

If you're sleepy and you know it, say goodnight...
If you're sleepy and you know it, start to snore...
If you're sleepy and you know it, do all three.

to the tune of "Bye and Bye"
Stars shining number, number 1, number 2, number 3,
Goodnight, say goodnight
Stars shining number, number 4, number 5, number 6
Goodnight, say goodnight
Stars shining number, number 7, number 8, number 9
Goodnight, say goodnight, it's time to go, and say goodnight.
Goodnight.


Links to Amazon are an affiliate link. You can help support Library Noise by purchasing any item (not just the one linked to!) through these links.

Monday, January 14, 2013

Farm Storytime

So my Thursday morning storytime had been billed as a 0-2, but we got a lot of older kids. I have a huge open space, so I don't need to turn anyone away and if I wanted to (which I don't) it would be really hard. So, for the new session we changed it to an all ages, just to more accurately reflect the reality of the program.

AND! I played my ukelele for the first time! It was super fun and I'm learning more songs and practicing so it'll be a regular part of storytime now.

to the tune of Happy Birthday, played on the uke
Good morning to you
Good morning to you
We’re glad that you’re here
Good morning to you

Way up in the sky, the little birds fly,
While down in the nest, the little birds rest.
With a wing to the left, and a wing to the right,
The little birds sleep all through the night.
Shhhhh! They’re sleeping!
The bright sun comes up, the dew falls away,
"Good Morning, Good Morning!" the little birds say.

Book: Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin, pictures by Betsy Lewin.

I love this story of rebellious farm animals. Some little kids find it a bit long, but if you have them "moo" with you on the "click clack moo, click clack moo, clickity-clack moo" refrain, it's fine.


Way up high in the apple tree, (both arms in the air)
Two red apples did I see. (both hands in fists in air)
I shook that tree as hard as I could, (shake all over)
And down came the apples – (fists fall down to floor)
Mmm, they were good! (rub stomach – yummy motion)

Hickory dickory dock

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold

Book: Lulu the Big Little Chick by Paulette Bogan.

Little kids love this story of a Lulu the chick who's sick of everyone telling her she's too little to do things. Parents love the fact that at the end of her barnyard adventures, Lulu realizes that maybe she isn't quite ready yet.

to the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat. I don't play this one, because I need my hands for the actions.
Roll, roll, roll your hands,
As slowly as can be.
Roll, roll, roll your hands,
Do it now with me.
Roll, roll, roll your hands,
As fast, as fast can be.
Roll, roll, roll your hands,
Do it now with me.
Clap, clap, clap your hands…
Shake, shake, shake your hands…
Stamp, stamp, stamp your feet…


Shake my Sillies Out. This is the first thing I learned to play on the ukelele! It's hard to jump and play at the same time, but I'm working on it.

I have a little heart (touch baby’s chest)
That goes thump thump thump (beat chest 3 times)
It keeps right on beating
As I jump jump jump (jump 3 times)

You have two arms they are for waving
And two feet that go stump stump
You have two eye they are for blinking
And a bottom to sit with a bump

Book: Barnyard Banter by Denise Fleming.

Who doesn't love making a ton of animal noises? Plus, the kids love trying to find goose in the pictures.

Old MacDonald Had a Farm (on the uke!)

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

to the tune of Shortnin' Bread
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every litte cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every litte cell in my body is well
I'm so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every litte cell in my body is well

To the tune of “Happy Birthday”

Goodbye to you
Goodbye to you
We’re glad that you came
Goodbye to you


Links to Amazon are an affiliate link. You can help support Library Noise by purchasing any item (not just the one linked to!) through these links.

Breaks, Ukes, Recognition, and the Reality of Life in the Trenches

Oh, my poor neglected programming blog. I have all these notes and pictures of programming I did this fall and winter and just never got around to posting it. :(

BUT! The winter storytime break is over, and one of my resolutions is to be better about blogging here. But, today I was messing around online a bit before getting to the blogging, when some very relevant posts came up in my reader. Hi Miss Julie! has an incredible post about the need for recognition on the front lines. About how those of us (usually female) who do the work don't get the press and recognition and speaking fees that the ivory tower visionaries (usually male) get.* Kelly at Stacked had a wonderful post in response, adding her call for more support and simple "thank yous" and how far they can go in an often thankless job.**

And how is that relevant to this blog? Well, I started it as a way to say Thank You. I read so many programming blogs (and blogs that cover programming) that I was starting to feel guilty because I'd take and take and take and take and take and thought maybe it was time to see if I could give back to this huge resource.

My new system takes storytime breaks and we've just started up again after a looooooooooong break. So, posts are coming today about what I did last week. I assume my readership is mainly programming librarians, so you know this, but just in case, storytime "breaks" aren't really breaks. It gives you time to recharge, but there's also a lot of planning and prepping (I cut up so much felt) and working on other projects (hello weeding!).

And, in the vein of "What I did on my Winter Vacation," my parents gave me a ukelele for Hanukkah, so I've been learning how to play that and it made its storytime debut last week! I used to play guitar in college and brought it in a few times for storytime, but it's big and annoying to haul to work a few times a week and it's also hard to switch between the guitar and a book. I was hoping the smaller size of a uke would fix that and YES it does! Of course, I had to learn how to play it first, but I've been practicing. (In fact, I just took a quick blog break to run through "If You're Happy and You Know It.")

So, I'm back.

Thank a librarian today.

*I will say that I've worked with some great front-line male children's librarians and I think they have it harder, because society tends to assume the worst of any guy that wants to work with kids. I've had patrons complain about "some guy lurking in the stacks" when it was just a coworker shelf-reading. But, it's a footnote because the larger argument holds.

**I've also been super-blessed in my career to work for systems and with a general public that tends to truly honor the day-to-day efforts of public service staff. It makes such a huge difference. My former supervisor ended most of his emails with "thank you for all that you do." It was such a simple closing, but the fact he took the time and knowing that he actually meant it made such a huge difference.

Links to Amazon are an affiliate link. You can help support Library Noise by purchasing any item (not just the one linked to!) through these links.