Saturday, March 31, 2012

Storytime Basics-- Toddlers

I've started doing a weekly storytime for toddlers (ages 12-23 months.) This isn't a new program for the library, but it's a new program for me. I used to do this a few years ago, but the program's evolved so much since then (for the better) that it's an entirely new thing for me.

Toddler time is a bridge between the baby storytime and our preschool storytimes, but it has much more in common with the baby program. It's still designed as a partial lapsit (toddlers don't sit still for very long) and it's still rhmye-heavy, but it goes for 25-30 minutes. Because they don't sit still for very long, I only do rhymes that have action, bounce, or tickle.

Like all of our programs, it's a drop-in. Amazingly, this is one of our most popular programs-- we often "sell out" and even have to occasionally turn people away. :(

As this is a new program, I'm still tweaking it. As of now, this is how the basic structure goes:

Welcome spiel:

Good morning everyone! For those of you who don't know me, my name is Miss Jennie and I'm one of the children's librarians here at Oxon Hill and this is my monster baby, Jack. [note: Jack is a stuffed Wild Thing from Where the Wild Things Are] Now, the thing to know about monster babies is they weigh a lot less than people babies, so I can lift Jack way above my head and not hurt my lower back. I have a hard time doing that with a person baby. Monster babies are also ok when they land on their heads. Most people babies are not. I do my actions really large so everyone can see, but do whatever works for you and your child.

Sing the Welcome Song

it's to the tune of "Happy Birthday" and goes

Good morning to X
Good morning to X
We're glad that you're here
Good morning to X

We go around the room and sing it to each child. Because this is a popular program, sometimes we sing it like

Good morning to X
Good morning to Y
We're glad that you're here
Good morning to Z.

That way everyone gets a special hello, but there's still time left to read some stories.

Way Up in the Sky
2-3 Action rhymes
Pease Porridge Hot
Hickory Dickory Dock

Read 1st book

For the first book, I do a board book that I can get several copies of so we all have a copy and can read together.

2-3 Action rhymes

Read 2nd Book

For the second book, I do a short picture book that's not in board form. Only I get a copy (although I have extra copies in case people want to check it out afterwards!)

2-3 Action rhymes
This is the Way the Ladies Ride

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

Each child has a maraca to shake as we sing and dance along.

Read 3rd Book

Like the first book, the third book is one where I have several copies so we can read it together.

Patty Cake
Every Little Cell

Sing the goodbye song. It's a mirror of the welcome song and is also to the tune of "Happy Birthday"

Goodbye to X
Goodbye to X
We're glad you came
Goodbye to X.

We go around the room and sing it to each child. If it's crowded or we're running late or people are getting fussy, we will sing

Goodbye to X
Goodbye to Y
We're glad that you came
Goodbye to Z.

For the first and third books, I do board books and I have enough copies so that every child + caregiver has a copy to read together and then I model interactive reading as we read the book out loud together. If there's an older sibling, I give them their own copy to read along with.

I'm able to have enough copies because we're a large library system and I can borrow copies from other branches.

Some rhymes change every week, but once I introduce a "new" rhyme, I tend to use it at least a few weeks in a row. Every rhyme (except for the longer ones) is done twice. I like to change rhymes so that the parents are exposed to a variety of ones to try. Also, as this program is aimed at the parents, a little variety is good so they keep coming back. I also change the books so that they are introduced to a wide variety of titles, authors, and illustrators.

The rhymes that I do every week are just personal favorites that tend to go over very well. "Hickory Dickory Dock" is one that I do for all my story times! The actions work well for parent and child, but also just for a child to do by his/herself. I started doing this one when I had children start to age up through different programs and it was one familiar to them when they hit a new setting and format.

I also have a "demonstration baby" (a newborn sized stuffed animal of one of the Wild Things) so I can model rhymes, actions, and reading.

I have a hand-out that lists all the books we read, songs we sang, and the words for all the rhymes (with action cues) that I hand out after the program is done so parents can play along at home. They are also free to check out the books we read, and most do.

Also, after every program, I wipe down the maracas with anti-septic wipes.


Thursday, March 29, 2012

Toddler Storytime

This is what we did yesterday for our toddler storytime! We have a new welcome and closing song that I thought would add oodles of time. No. Still need to figure out my timing! So frustrating for all of us!

Welcome Songs:

Last week, we had a request to bring back the welcome song that the librarians who used to do this program used, so I learned it!

To the tune of “Happy Birthday”

Good morning to you
Good morning to you
We’re glad that you’re here
Good morning to you

Go around the room, singing to each child, substituting their name for “you”

Of course, I still like the opening song we were using, so we now have TWO openers! Huzzah!

Way up in the sky, the little birds fly,
While down in the nest, the little birds rest.
With a wing to the left, and a wing to the right,
The little birds sleep all through the night.
Shhhhh! They’re sleeping!
The bright sun comes up, the dew falls away,
"Good Morning, Good Morning!" the little birds say.

Mother Goose Rhymes:

to the tune of “you are my sunshine"

You have two arms, they are for waving
You have two feet to go stump stump
You have to eyes, they are for blinking
And a bottom to sit with a bump

This is big big big (Hold arms out to side)
This is small small small (Cup hands together)
This is short short short (Hold hands with palms facing each other)
This is tall tall tall (Reach one hand above head)
This is fast fast fast (Circle fists quickly)
This is slow slow slow (Circle fists slowly)
This is yes yes yes (Nod)
This is no no no (Shake head)

Hot hot bread (pat baby’s hands or belly)
Hot hot bread
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle underarms)
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle the other arm)
Oh so nice and round (draw circle on belly)
Oh so delicious
Give me one (count baby’s fingers)
Give me two
Give me three
Give me four
Give me five

We’re going to Kentucky (clap)
We’re going to the fair
To see the senorita with flowers in her hair!
Oh, shake it, baby, shake it (shake)
Shake it if you can
Shake it like a milkshake
And shake it once again
Oh, roll it to the bottom (roll arms to the floor)
Roll it to the top (roll arms up in the air)
And turn around, turn around,
Until I holler STOP!

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Peek-A Who? by Nina Landen

This one has everything I love-- guessing, animal sounds, and a mirror. It's a wonderful story time book for this age group!


Bounces and Action Rhymes:

Arms up, arms down, arms up
And wave them all around
Then tickle tickle wiggle giggle
Everybody knows
That’s how baby’s hokey pokey goes

Legs up, legs down, legs up
And kick them all around
Then tickle tickle wiggle giggle
Everybody knows
That’s how baby’s hokey pokey goes!

I have a little heart (touch baby’s chest)
That goes thump thump thump (beat chest 3 times)
It keeps right on beating
As I jump jump jump (jump 3 times)

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

We all have maracas that we shake, wiggle, clap, jump, and stretch along with the CD.

Book:

Llama Llama Wakey-Wake by Anna Dewdney

As I said last week, I'm a huge fan of Llama Llama, so of course we read the other board book! There are more coming out this spring-- I can't wait!

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well

To the tune of “Happy Birthday”

Goodbye to you
Goodbye to you
We’re glad that you came
Goodbye to you

Go around the room singing to each child, substituting their name for "you"




Baby Storytime

This is what we did yesterday for our baby storytime!

Welcome Song:

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Go around the room, singing the to each child, substituting the child’s name for “baby”

Mother Goose Rhymes:

Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey,
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away

Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full.
One for the master, one for the dame, one for the little boy who lives down the lane
Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full.

Go around the room singing to each child, substituting the child's name for "the little boy"

Hot hot bread (pat baby’s hands or belly)
Hot hot bread
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle underarms)
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle the other arm)
Oh so nice and round (draw circle on belly)
Oh so delicious
Give me one (count baby’s fingers)
Give me two
Give me three
Give me four
Give me five

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Peek-A Who? by Nina Landen

This one has everything I love-- guessing, animal sounds, and a mirror. It's a wonderful story time book for this age group!

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

Round and round the butter dish (trace circle on child’s tummy)
One, two, three! (walk fingers up chest)
A little here, a little there, (tap one cheek and then the other)
As tasty as can be! (tickle or kiss baby)

I have a little heart (touch baby’s chest)
That goes thump thump thump (beat chest 3 times)
It keeps right on beating
As I jump jump jump (jump 3 times)

Charlie Chaplin went to France (bouncing baby on lap)
To teach the ladies how to dance!
First he did the rumba (move baby's knees back and forth)
Then he did the kicks (move baby's legs in kicking motion)
Then he did the samba (move baby's legs up and down together)
And then he did the splits! (gently move baby's legs apart and together again)

A little frog in a pond am I
Hippity hippity hop
And I can bounce in the air so high
Hippity hippity hop

Bounce baby in rhythm to the rhyme, lifting him or her up on “air so high”

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

We all have maracas that we shake, wiggle, clap, jump, and stretch along with the CD.

Book:

Llama Llama Wakey-Wake by Anna Dewdney

As I said last week, I'm a huge fan of Llama Llama, so of course we read the other board book! There are more coming out this spring-- I can't wait!

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well



Bloggiesta!

Bloggiesta starts tomorrow! A weekend to do all the little things you want to do on your blog.

I'm participating over at Biblio File, but some of the things I have on my to-do list are for Library Noise, so keep an eye out!

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Toddler Storytime

I'm still trying to find my groove with this program. I added more rhymes to make it longer, but we still ran a little short. I also had a request to sing the Welcome Song that the librarian who used to do this program opened with. So, I'll be learning that one and using it next week! It incorporates names, which I really like to do, but I'm hesitant with this group because it's rather large and I want to have time to sing something else besides the welcome song. But, Miss Lauren has a trick. AND maybe this will help add in the extra time? WE SHALL SEE! (I know you'll all be on the edge of your seats until next week to see how it goes.)

Also, I'm messing with my blog post format a bit. Today I'm putting section headings in large and bold, actions in italics, and my comments on things in green. Does this work or not? What's easiest for YOU dear reader?

Welcome Song:

Way up in the sky, the little birds fly,
While down in the nest, the little birds rest.
With a wing to the left, and a wing to the right,
The little birds sleep all through the night.
Shhhhh! They’re sleeping!
The bright sun comes up, the dew falls away,
"Good Morning, Good Morning!" the little birds say.

Mother Goose Rhymes:

(to the tune of “you are my sunshine)

You have two arms, they are for waving
You have two feet to go stump stump
You have to eyes, they are for blinking
And a bottom to sit with a bump

I only get to do these rhymes when it rains. It makes me happy.

It’s raining it’s pouring,
The old man is snoring.
He bumped his head and he went to bed
And he couldn’t get up in the morning.

Rain rain go away,
Come again another day
Little baby wants to play
Rain Rain go away

Go around the room, singing to each child, using their name for "baby"

NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! I saw this on last week's Poetry Friday offering from Readertotz.

Doodle doodle doo,
The Princess lost her shoe:
Her Highness hopped,
The fiddler stopped,
Not knowing what to do.

This is big big big (Hold arms out to side)
This is small small small (Cup hands together)
This is short short short (Hold hands with palms facing each other)
This is tall tall tall (Reach one hand above head)
This is fast fast fast (Circle fists quickly)
This is slow slow slow (Circle fists slowly)
This is yes yes yes (Nod)
This is no no no (Shake head)

NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! So, when I don't work on Friday, I get to go to baby storytime, but as a parent. It's a very different experience and it's been really interesting to see programming from the other side. Anyway, this is a rhyme we did with Ms. Desiree last week. Except Ms. Desiree is much more hardcore than I am and did it in Hindi. I told today's parents that I would work on the Hindi (Ms. Desiree said she found it on YouTube) and that we'd do it that way in a few weeks, once I got it down. But it's fun in English, too.

Hot hot bread (pat baby’s hands or belly)
Hot hot bread
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle underarms)
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle the other arm)
Oh so nice and round (draw circle on belly)
Oh so delicious
Give me one (count baby’s fingers)
Give me two
Give me three
Give me four
Give me five

We’re going to Kentucky (clap)
We’re going to the fair
To see the senorita with flowers in her hair!
Oh, shake it, baby, shake it (shake)
Shake it if you can
Shake it like a milkshake
And shake it once again
Oh, roll it to the bottom (roll arms to the floor)
Roll it to the top (roll arms up in the air)
And turn around, turn around,
Until I holler STOP!

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Duck & Goose, 1, 2, 3 by Tad Hills

Duck and Goose are adorable and fun and counting books are always good. How do you read counting books in storytime? I always actually count. So, the text says "1 goose, 2 ducks, 3 clouds, etc." I say "1. 1 goose. 1, 2. 2 ducks. 1, 2,3. 3 clouds." And I point to each thing as we count them. And then I resist the urge to laugh like Count von Count.

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

I have a little mouse, who found a piece of cheese. (start at baby's armpit, then run fingers down to palm of hand)

He gave him a piece, he gave her a piece, he gave me a piece, (pretend to share cheese with others)

Then he ran back home, and he went to sleep! (run fingers back up arm, then tuck into armpit and tickle!)

This one didn't work that well. I'll try it another time, but I can't find the rhythm.

to the tune “Wheels on the Bus”

I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap.
I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap.
They’re a part of me.

I can make my feet
Go stamp, stamp, stamp…
I can make my legs
Go hop, hop, hop…

NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! Another new rhyme, courtesy of Ms. Desiree!

I have a little heart (touch baby’s chest)
That goes thump thump thump (beat chest 3 times)
It keeps right on beating
As I jump jump jump (jump 3 times)

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

we shake maracas and sing and dance along

Book:

Llama Llama Nighty--Night by Anna Dewdney

I love the Llama Llama books for preschoolers and in my house, we were super excited to see the Dewdney was coming out with board books. This is the way to do a board book of a popular picture book-- it's not a scaled down version of the book, but rather taking a familiar character and writing an age-appropriate book.

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well

Baby Storytime

Good afternoon, all. I'm still messing with my format a bit. Today I'm putting section headings in large and bold, actions in italics, and my comments on things in green. Does this work or not? What's easiest for YOU dear reader?

Welcome Song:

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Go around the room, singing to each child, using their name for "baby"

Mother Goose Rhymes:

I only get to do these rhymes when it rains. It makes me happy.

It’s raining it’s pouring,
The old man is snoring.
He bumped his head and he went to bed
And he couldn’t get up in the morning.

Rain rain go away,
Come again another day
Little baby wants to play
Rain Rain go away

Go around the room, singing to each child, using their name for "baby"

This is big big big (Hold arms out to side)
This is small small small (Cup hands together)
This is short short short (Hold hands with palms facing each other)
This is tall tall tall (Reach one hand above head)
This is fast fast fast (Circle fists quickly)
This is slow slow slow (Circle fists slowly)
This is yes yes yes (Nod)
This is no no no (Shake head)

NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! NEW RHYME! So, when I don't work on Friday, I get to go to baby storytime, but as a parent. It's a very different experience and it's been really interesting to see programming from the other side. Anyway, this is a rhyme we did with Ms. Desiree last week. Except Ms. Desiree is much more hardcore than I am and did it in Hindi. I told today's parents that I would work on the Hindi (Ms. Desiree said she found it on YouTube) and that we'd do it that way in a few weeks, once I got it down. But it's fun in English, too.

Hot hot bread (pat baby’s hands or belly)
Hot hot bread
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle underarms)
Ready in the kitchen (crawl up and tickle the other arm)
Oh so nice and round (draw circle on belly)
Oh so delicious
Give me one (count baby’s fingers)
Give me two
Give me three
Give me four
Give me five

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Duck & Goose, 1, 2, 3 by Tad Hills

Duck and Goose are adorable and fun and counting books are always good. How do you read counting books in storytime? I always actually count. So, the text says "1 goose, 2 ducks, 3 clouds, etc." I say "1. 1 goose. 1, 2. 2 ducks. 1, 2,3. 3 clouds." And I point to each thing as we count them. And then I resist the urge to laugh like Count von Count.

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

Charlie Chaplin went to France (bouncing baby on lap)
To teach the ladies how to dance!
First he did the rumba (move baby's knees back and forth)
Then he did the kicks (move baby's legs in kicking motion)
Then he did the samba (move baby's legs up and down together)
And then he did the splits! (gently move baby's legs apart and together again)

to the tune “Wheels on the Bus”

I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap.
I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap.
They’re a part of me.

I can make my feet
Go stamp, stamp, stamp…
I can make my legs
Go hop, hop, hop…

A little frog in a pond am I
Hippity hippity hop
And I can bounce in the air so high
Hippity hippity hop

Bounce baby in rhythm to the rhyme, lifting him or her up on “air so high”

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

we shake maracas and sing and dance along

Book:

Llama Llama Nighty--Night by Anna Dewdney

I love the Llama Llama books for preschoolers and in my house, we were super excited to see the Dewdney was coming out with board books. This is the way to do a board book of a popular picture book-- it's not a scaled down version of the book, but rather taking a familiar character and writing an age-appropriate book.

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well


Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Book Club: No. 1 Car Spotter



Today at book club we discussed Atinuke's The No 1 Car Spotter.

I picked this book because it was funny, easy, and featured a boy. ALSO! It takes place in Africa, in a rural village which I thought would be nice change of scenery from where we live and what we normally see in books.

Some of the kids liked it and thought it was funny or liked the adventure of the different setting BUT! SADLY! most of them didn't like it. They thought it was boring (partly because they couldn't wrap their heads around why you'd want to spot cars and spend all day doing it. That, and they thought naming your kid Coca-Cola was stupid.)

One thing I've realized is that my regular group of readers doesn't have great reading comprehension skills, so a lot of my questions focused on that.

Did you like the book? Why or why not?

Why is No. 1 called No. 1? Why is Coca-Cola called Coca-Cola? (These two have definite "right" answers.)

Using what we know about how No. 1 and Coca-Cola got their names, why do you think Auntie Fine-Fine is called Auntie Fine-Fine? What about Mama Coca-Cola? Uncle Go Easy? Mama B?

What is No. 1 supposed to buy at the market for Auntie Fine-Fine? Why do you think he messed up?

What are some of the differences between life in No. 1's village and life in the DC-area?-- The resulting discussion touched on whether or not places like this exist in the US and why all the men were in the city (I was going to ask this as a separate conversation about far-away parents, but we ran out of time) and whether or not school in the US is free.

We then discussed their questions about the book, which were pretty basic but was good to see what they were puzzling over.

Monday, March 19, 2012

Summer Reading Plans

Last year, we did a super-successful passive program* making 1000 paper cranes for Japan.

photo by Ana Carol Mendes
I've been looking to do something similar for awhile. This summer, I learned how to make origami stars. They're super fun and SO MUCH easier than cranes.

BUT! What do so with them?

The kids can take them home (and I expect many will go home)

We can string them together into a garland to hang around the room.

I asked on Twitter this morning. Nico suggested filling vases with them for decorations.

Any other ideas?

What passive crafts are YOU doing this summer?




*For those who don't know a 'passive program' is one that the kids do on their own and is often on-going.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Toddler Story time

Eep! I forgot to post last week's storytime. Lucky you! Bonus storytime!

Welcome Song:

Way up in the sky, the little birds fly,
While down in the nest, the little birds rest.
With a wing to the left, and a wing to the right,
The little birds sleep all through the night.
Shhhhh! They’re sleeping!
The bright sun comes up, the dew falls away,
"Good Morning, Good Morning!" the little birds say.

Mother Goose Rhymes:

to the tune of “you are my sunshine"

You have two arms, they are for waving
You have two feet to go stump stump
You have to eyes, they are for blinking
And a bottom to sit with a bump

Ring around the Rosy
A pocket full of posy
Ashes, ashes
We all fall down

Tick tock, tick tock
I’m a little cuckoo clock
Tick tock, tick tock
Now it’s striking one o’clock
Tick tock, tick tock
Cuckoo!

Rock baby back and forth and then lift baby in the air on “cuckoo”. Alternately, child can stand on floor and rock, and then jump on “cuckoo.” Repeat for two and three o’clock.

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Ruby's Tea for Two by Rosemary Wells

This is either a cautionary tale about older sisters or younger brothers, depending on your perspective. Ruby and her friend are having a tea for two party and make Max be the waiter, but he wants tea and cake, too. As always, Max has the perfect solution. It has a plot! And it's funny! Plus, who doesn't love Max and Ruby?

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap.
I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap.
They’re a part of me.

I can make my feet
Go stamp, stamp, stamp…
I can make my legs
Go hop, hop, hop…

Tommy O’Flynn and his old gray mare
Went off to see the county fair
The bridge fell out and the bridge fell in
And that was the end of Tommy O’Flynn, O’Flynn, O’Flynn

Bounce in rhythm to the rhyme. Let child fall between your knees on “the bridge fell in”

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

We shake our maracas, dance and sing along to the CD.

Book:

Do You Know New? by Jean Marzollo, pictures by Mari Takabayashi

This is a simple rhyming text about various things in baby's world. (I just realized that ALL the rhymes end with the "ooo" sound-- do you know new? do you know moo? do you know blue?) The BEST part about this book is when it say "do you know new" THERE IS A MIRROR. Do you know what babies LOVE? Mirrors.

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

to the tune of "Shortnin’ Bread"

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well









Toddler Storytime

I'm still finding my zone with the toddler's. It's heavily based on the baby program (they take place back-to-back) with different rhymes. My main thing is timing. I always think I have enough planned and I'm always coming up 3-5 minutes short.

It remains a work in progress.

Welcome Song:

Way up in the sky, the little birds fly,
While down in the nest, the little birds rest.
With a wing to the left, and a wing to the right,
The little birds sleep all through the night.
Shhhhh! They’re sleeping!
The bright sun comes up, the dew falls away,
"Good Morning, Good Morning!" the little birds say.

Mother Goose Rhymes:

to the tune of “you are my sunshine"

You have two arms, they are for waving
You have two feet to go stump stump
You have to eyes, they are for blinking
And a bottom to sit with a bump

Davy Davy Dumpling
Boil him in the pot (wiggle child)
Sugar him (tickle gently)
And butter him (stroke gently)
And eat him while he’s hot! (nibble child’s neck, ears, cheeks)

This is big big big (Hold arms out to side)
This is small small small (Cup hands together)
This is short short short (Hold hands with palms facing each other)
This is tall tall tall (Reach one hand above head)
This is fast fast fast (Circle fists quickly)
This is slow slow slow (Circle fists slowly)
This is yes yes yes (Nod)
This is no no no (Shake head)

We’re going to Kentucky (clap)
We’re going to the fair
To see the senorita with flowers in her hair!
Oh, shake it, baby, shake it (shake)
Shake it if you can
Shake it like a milkshake
And shake it once again
Oh, roll it to the bottom (roll arms to the floor)
Roll it to the top (roll arms up in the air)
And turn around, turn around,
Until I holler STOP!

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Where Is Baby's Belly Button? by Karen Katz

Lift-the-flaps are always winners. I love Karen Katz's round-faced children. Points for ethnic diversity. This is also a great one to model interactive reading with. As the book goes "Where are baby's eyes?" Lift the flap "Under baby's hat!" then you can say "where are YOUR eyes?" point to them "There they are!" ALSO! This was the perfect book today, because before we read it, one of the kids kept lifting up her shirt and pointing to her belly button!

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap.
I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap.
They’re a part of me.

I can make my feet
Go stamp, stamp, stamp…
I can make my legs
Go hop, hop, hop…

Tommy O’Flynn and his old gray mare
Went off to see the county fair
The bridge fell out and the bridge fell in
And that was the end of Tommy O’Flynn, O’Flynn, O’Flynn

Bounce in rhythm to the rhyme. Let child fall between your knees on “the bridge fell in”

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

We shake our maracas while singing, clapping, jumping, wiggling and shaking along.

Book:

I See Me! by Pegi Deitz Shea, pictures by Lucia Washburn

Simple rhyming text explores all the places that baby sees his/her reflection. This one's out of print now and I probably won't do it again, because I had a hard time gathering up enough copies, but I like it.

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

to the tune of "Shortnin’ Bread"

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well











Baby Storytime

Eep! I forgot to post last week's storytime. Lucky you! Bonus storytime!

Introduction to Baby Storytime

Welcome Song:

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Go around the room, substitute each child’s name for “baby”

Mother Goose Rhymes:

Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater
Had a wife and couldn’t keep her
He put her in a pumpkin shell
And there he kept her very well

Ring around the Rosy
A pocket full of posy
Ashes, ashes
We all fall down

Davy Davy Dumpling
Boil him in the pot (wiggle child)
Sugar him (tickle gently)
And butter him (stroke gently)
And eat him while he’s hot! (nibble child’s neck, ears, cheeks)

Children in the barnyard
Staying out of trouble
Along came a turkey (slowly creep fingers up arm)
And . . . "Gobble, gobble, gobble!" (tickle underarm,
or move in for a gobble on child's neck)

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Ruby's Tea for Two by Rosemary Wells

This is either a cautionary tale about older sisters or younger brothers, depending on your perspective. Ruby and her friend are having a tea for two party and make Max be the waiter, but he wants tea and cake, too. As always, Max has the perfect solution. It has a plot! And it's funny! Plus, who doesn't love Max and Ruby?

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

Round and round the Garden (trace circle on baby’s palm)
Little bunny goes
Hippity hop, hippity hop (hop up baby’s arm with two fingers)
He’s gonna get your nose! (grab baby’s nose)

to the tune “Wheels on the Bus”

I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap.
I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap.
They’re a part of me.

I can make my feet
Go stamp, stamp, stamp…
I can make my legs
Go hop, hop, hop…

Tommy O’Flynn and his old gray mare
Went off to see the county fair
The bridge fell out and the bridge fell in
And that was the end of Tommy O’Flynn, O’Flynn, O’Flynn

Bounce in rhythm to the rhyme. Let child fall between your knees on “the bridge fell in”

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

We shake our maracas, dance and sing along to the CD.

Book:

Do You Know New? by Jean Marzollo, pictures by Mari Takabayashi

This is a simple rhyming text about various things in baby's world. (I just realized that ALL the rhymes end with the "ooo" sound-- do you know new? do you know moo? do you know blue?) The BEST part about this book is when it say "do you know new" THERE IS A MIRROR. Do you know what babies LOVE? Mirrors.

Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!


Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

to the tune of "Shortnin’ Bread"

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well

Baby Storytime

Introduction to Baby Storytime.

Welcome Song:

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Go around the room and sing to each child, substituting the child’s name for “baby”

Mother Goose Rhymes:

We’re going to Kentucky (clap)
We’re going to the fair
To see the senorita with flowers in her hair!
Oh, shake it, baby, shake it (shake)
Shake it if you can
Shake it like a milkshake
And shake it once again
Oh, roll it to the bottom (roll arms to the floor)
Roll it to the top (roll arms up in the air)
And turn around, turn around,
Until I holler STOP!

Davy Davy Dumpling
Boil him in the pot (wiggle child)
Sugar him (tickle gently)
And butter him (stroke gently)
And eat him while he’s hot! (nibble child’s neck, ears, cheeks)

This is big big big (Hold arms out to side)
This is small small small (Cup hands together)
This is short short short (Hold hands with palms facing each other)
This is tall tall tall (Reach one hand above head)
This is fast fast fast (Circle fists quickly)
This is slow slow slow (Circle fists slowly)
This is yes yes yes (Nod)
This is no no no (Shake head)

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Book:

Where Is Baby's Belly Button? by Karen Katz

Lift-the-flaps are always winners. I love Karen Katz's round-faced children. Points for ethnic diversity. This is also a great one to model interactive reading with. As the book goes "Where are baby's eyes?" Lift the flap "Under baby's hat!" then you can say "where are YOUR eyes?" point to them "There they are!"

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

Charlie Chaplin went to France (bouncing baby on lap)
To teach the ladies how to dance!
First he did the rumba (move baby's knees back and forth)
Then he did the kicks (move baby's legs in kicking motion)
Then he did the samba (move baby's legs up and down together)
And then he did the splits! (gently move baby's legs apart and together again)

to the tune “Wheels on the Bus”

I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap,
Clap, clap, clap.
I can make my hands
Go clap, clap, clap.
They’re a part of me.

I can make my feet
Go stamp, stamp, stamp…
I can make my legs
Go hop, hop, hop…

Tommy O’Flynn and his old gray mare
Went off to see the county fair
The bridge fell out and the bridge fell in
And that was the end of Tommy O’Flynn, O’Flynn, O’Flynn

Bounce in rhythm to the rhyme. Let child fall between your knees on “the bridge fell in”

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi

We shake our maracas while singing, clapping, jumping, wiggling and shaking along.

Book:

I See Me! by Pegi Deitz Shea, pictures by Lucia Washburn

Simple rhyming text explores all the places that baby sees his/her reflection. This one's out of print now and I probably won't do it again, because I had a hard time gathering up enough copies, but I like it.


Closing:

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well

Friday, March 2, 2012

Outreach Story Time

Today a group of special needs students from one of the local elementary schools came over for a story program. I don't get to do a lot of the school visits and outreach programs because of when I work. Because we have our drop-in story times on Wednesday and Thursday, we schedule our outreach on Monday and Tuesday. But... I work Monday and Tuesday night, so I'm not here in the morning to do outreach! Sometimes, depending on staffing levels, we can do a Friday morning program, which is what happened today. YAY!

With special needs groups, we try to find out as much information as possible about the class and what their abilities are. We knew this group was at about a K-1st grade level, all were mobile, some were verbal, and they liked singing songs with motions and clapping. I was ready with a range of stories and rhymes and songs so I could tailor the program as I went.

They specifically requested stories about African American History.

Welcome:

Introductions

Where is Thumbkin


Book:

Virgie Goes to School with Us Boys by Elizabeth Fitzgerald Howard, illustrated by E. B. Lewis

This one is a long and I did it first because (a) always start with your longest books and (b) to do a gauge of what their attention span was going to be like. It didn't go over too well. I really like it though. It's about a young girl who demands to go to the new school with her brothers, shortly after the Civil War. She proves she's up to the task of the seven-mile hike to get there.

Rhymes:

Hickory Dickory Dock

Five Little Monkeys Swinging from a Tree

There are both rhymes that I do rather dramatically, with lots of actions and clapping. They LOVED them.


Book:

Rap a Tap Tap: Here's Bojangles - Think of That! written and illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

A great rhyming and repetitive text about Bojangles-- the world's greatest tap dancer. I introduced the story telling them a bit about Bill 'Bojangles' Robinson, which I got from the back matter.

Song:

Shake My Sillies Out written and performed by Raffi

Rhyme:

To get them settled, I kinda made something up as I went along

We stretch up to the sky
We stretch down to the ground
We stretch to the left
We stretch to the right
We reach up high
And fold our hands
And sit back down
Quiet quiet quiet as mice.

Then, I got myself in trouble

"Are you guys ready to hear another story?"
"NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"
"No?! What do you want to do instead?"
"Sing! Clap!"
"Uh...."

Song:

B-I-N-G-O


Book:

Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave written by Laban Carrick Hill, illustrated by Bryan Collier

I introduced this book by telling them that it was true, Dave the Potter was a real person and that the American History Museum downtown had one of his pots. If you haven't read this book about a slave who wrote little poems in his pots, you really should. Great story, great text, great illustrations.

The back matter has photographs of his work, which I also showed them. The teachers were most interested and I think there's a now a field trip in the works. (I did warn them that I'm unsure if the pot is actually on display and they might want to check with the Smithsonian first!)

Rhyme:

5 Green and Speckled Frogs

I wish I had thought ahead about this one and grabbed my flannel board set! Ah well.


Book:

We March written and illustrated by Shane Evans

Did you guys just love Underground? You'll like We March. Same illustration style (but a lot more light!) same sparse writing style. This one is about the 1963 March on Washington. I introduced it to them by saying a bit about the march and how it took place right downtown and to keep a look out for places they'd recognize in the pictures, like the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial.

Song:

Comin' Round the Mountain

I sang most of the first verse as "She'll be comin' round the railroad as she comes!" before I realized why it sounded weird. Ah well. We all had a good laugh and started again.