Thursday, February 24, 2011

Baby Storytime

We did the first book after "Hickory Dickory Dock" and then after "This is the Way the Ladies Ride" we sang "Shake my Sillies Out" and read the second book.

I like the board book versions of Yolen and Teague's Dinosaur books. They're easier and shorter than the picture book versions and are get the length and word/picture ration just right for a board book.

I also love Dav Pilkey's Big Dog, Little Dog series in board book-- they're short and sweet (perfect for the format) but funny and with plot! That's hard to do but these nail it on the head.

"Round and Round the Garden" and "Ride a Pony, Ride a Pony" were both new rhymes last week, so we used them again this week and will next week as well.

Also, I'm lucky enough to have a few BRAND NEW BABIES coming, so everything's new to a lot of my attendees at the moment.

"Cushy cow bonny" is rather obscure, but it has great rhythm. I like mixing rhymes that everyone should know with ones that most people don't know. It keeps things interesting.


Books We Read Today:
How Do Dinosaurs Learn Their Colors by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

Songs We Sang Today:
Shake My Sillies Out” by Raffi

Welcome Song:

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Substitute the child’s name for “baby”

Mother Goose Rhymes:

Cushy cow bonny, let down thy milk,
And I will give thee a gown of silk;
A gown of silk and a silver tee,
If thou wilt let down thy milk to me.

Diddle Diddle Dumpling, my son John
Went to bed with his britches on
One shoe off and one shoe on
Diddle Diddle Dumpling, my son John

Tick tock, tick tock
I am a little cuckoo clock
Tick tock, tick tock
Now it’s striking one o’clock
Tick tock, tick tock
Cuckoo!

Rock baby back and forth and then lift baby in the air on “cuckoo”. Repeat for two and three o’clock.

Clap hands, clap hands
Dishes in a battle
Pots and pans all crash about
Bang! Rattle! Rattle!

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

Five little peas in a pea pod pressed 
One grew, two grew, so did all the rest.
They grew and they grew  
And they grew and never stopped 
They grew so big that the pea pod POPPED!

On the first line, hold up a fist with fingers hidden. During the second line, slowly extend your fingers out. As the peas keep growing, move your hands further and further apart until arms are extended. End with a large clap on “POPPED!”

Round and round the Garden (trace circle on baby’s palm)
Little bunny goes
Hippity hop, hippity hop (hop up baby’s arm with two fingers)
He’s gonna get your nose! (grab baby’s nose)

Ride a pony, ride a pony
Into town, Into town
When you get there, When you get there
Don’t fall down! Don't fall down!

Bounce baby on your knees to the rhythm of the rhyme. On the second “don’t fall down!” gently drop the baby between your knees.

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

Closing Song:

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Baby Storytime

Here's the handout for story time last Wednesday. I read the first book after "Hickory Dickory Dock" and we sang "Shake my Sillies Out" after "This is the Way the Ladies Ride" followed immediately by the second book.

While reading Snuggle Wuggle we also made animal sounds of each of the animals. When reading Spot Can Count instead of just saying the number of animals on each page, we counted them ourselves. This is a fun book because, like all Spot books, it has flaps to lift. Every one loves to lift the flaps!

When we sang "Are you Sleeping?" we went around the room and sang to each child (we had a few newborns who *were* sleeping, so this was fun) so it went "Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping? / Jennifer? Jennifer?" I just stretched out names to fit the melody.

Rhymes used in Story Time
2/16/2011

Books We Read Today:
Snuggle Wuggle by Jonathan London
Spot Can Count by Eric Hill

Songs We Sang Today:
Shake My Sillies Out” by Raffi

Welcome Song:

Where is baby? Where is baby?
There (s)he is! There (s)he is!
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo!

Substitute the child’s name for “baby”

Mother Goose Rhymes:

Ring around the Rosy
A pocket full of posy
Ashes, ashes
We all fall down

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall
All the king’s horses and all the king’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again!

Tick tock, tick tock
I am a little cuckoo clock
Tick tock, tick tock
Now it’s striking one o’clock
Tick tock, tick tock
Cuckoo!

Rock baby back and forth and then lift baby in the air on “cuckoo”. Repeat for two and three o’clock.

Are you sleeping, are you sleeping
Brother John  Brother John
Morning bells are ringing, morning bells are ringing
Ding dang dong, Ding dang dong


Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold
Pease porridge in the pot, 9 days old
Some like it hot, some like it cold
Some like it in the pot, 9 days old

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck two, the mouse said “woo”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck three, the mouse said “wee”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck four, the mouse said “no more”
Hickory dickory dock (tick tock, tick tock)

Bounces and Action Rhymes:

The little mice go creeping, creeping, creeping
The little mice go creeping all through the house

The big black cat goes stalking, stalking, stalking
The big black cat goes stalking all through the house

The little mice go scampering, scampering, scampering
The little mice go scampering all through the house

When the mice go creeping, have your fingers walk slowly on the baby, when the cat goes stalking, slide your hands up and down the baby’s body, when the mice go scampering, have your fingers run quickly all over the baby.

Round and round the Garden (trace circle on baby’s palm)
Little bunny goes
Hippity hop, hippity hop (hop up baby’s arm with two fingers)
He’s gonna get your nose! (grab baby’s nose)

Ride a pony, ride a pony
Into town, Into town
When you get there, When you get there
Don’t fall down! Don't fall down!

Bounce baby on your knees to the rhythm of the rhyme. On the second “don’t fall down!” gently drop the baby between your knees.

This is the way the ladies ride:
Walk walk walk
This is the way the gentlemen ride:
Trot trot trot
This is the way the children ride:
BOOM BOOM BOOM

Bounce the baby on your knee or foot. When the ladies ride, bounce very softly, for the gentlemen, bounce a little more, and then bounce very vigorously when the children ride!

Patty cake, patty cake
Baker’s man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can!
Roll it, and pat it
And mark it with a B
And throw it in the oven for baby and me!

Clap baby’s hands for the first three lines. When rolling the cake, roll your hands, and then pat your knees when patting the cake. Draw a B on baby’s hand when marking the cake and mime throwing it in the oven at the end.

Closing Song:

(to the tune of Shortnin’ Bread)

Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
I’m so glad every little cell
In my body is happy and well
Every little cell in my body is happy
Every little cell in my body is well

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Introduction to Baby Storytime

Every week, I do a story time for infants-- age birth-12 months. It's a lapsit program, so it's designed to have one child + one adult. (Sometimes in the case of siblings or twins, there's more than one child per adult.) The program lasts for 20 minutes and is attended on a drop-in basis. I don't do preregistration because they're BABIES! You never know if you're going to get out the door in time! Fire code says there can only be 25 people in the story time room, including me, so attendance is capped at 12 babies + 12 adults.

Many people wonder what the point in doing story time for kids this young is. We want to expose kids to regular library attendance and books as soon as possible. I love the idea that these kids will have regular library trips as part of their routine since birth. There's the bonding element between adult and baby. There's exposure to nursery rhymes and tickles and songs and bounces-- all of which have been shown to be very good for baby brain development. It also lets the babies interact with other babies. They LOVE this!

Mostly though, it's a program for parents. I teach them new rhymes and songs they can do at home. I model interactive reading and how to share these rhymes and stories so they can continue these interactions with their children throughout the day. And, even though this isn't one of the library's goals, I know the parents like meeting other parents, they like getting out of the house and meeting new people and exchanging tips and ideas. They often stay for a long time after the program has ended to talk and many friendships and playgroups have been formed out of story time. That's not why we do the program, but it's a darn cool side effect.

So, the basic structure of my program goes like this:

Welcome spiel:

Good morning everyone! For those of you who don't know me, my name is Miss Jennie and I'm one of the children's librarians here at Oxon Hill and this is my monster baby, Jack. [note: Jack is a stuffed Wild Thing from Where the Wild Things Are] Now, the thing to know about monster babies is they weigh a lot less than people babies, so I can lift Jack way above my head and not hurt my lower back. I have a hard time doing that with a person baby. Monster babies are also ok when they land on their heads. Most people babies are not. I do my actions really large so everyone can see, but do whatever works for you and your child.

Sing the Welcome Song

it's to the tune of "Where is thumbkin" and gets sung to each child. If a child is late, we sing it to him or her when they come in.

Where is [insert name here?] Where is [insert name here?] (cover eyes with hands)
There (s)he is! There (s)he is! (point to the child)
I'm so glad to see you! I'm so glad to see you!
Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo! (play peek-a-boo with the child)

3-4 Mother Goose Rhymes/Songs/more subtle action rhymes
Pease Porridge Hot
Hickory Dickory Dock

Read 1st book

4-5 Action Rhymes/Tickle Rhymes/Knee Bounces
This is the Way the Ladies Ride

Shake My Sillies Out by Raffi (with each baby having a maraca to hold and shake, or for their caregiver to hold and shake)

Read 2nd book (handing out the second book is a good bait-and-switch to get the maracas back with fewer tears!)

Patty Cake

Sing the goodbye song with is to the tune of "Shortin' Bread"

Every little cell in your body is happy
Every little cell in your body is well
Every little cell in your body is happy
Every little cell in your body is well
I'm so glad every little cell in your body is happy and well
I'm so glad every little cell in your body is happy and well
Every little cell in your body is happy
Every little cell in your body is well


The books we do are all board books, and I have enough copies so that every baby + caregiver has a copy to read together and then I model interactive reading as we read the book out loud together. If there's an older sibling, I give them their own copy to read along with.

I'm able to have enough copies because we're a large library system and I can borrow copies from other branches.

Some rhymes change every week, but once I introduce a "new" rhyme, I tend to use it at least a few weeks in a row. Every rhyme (except for the longer ones) is done twice. I like to change rhymes so that the parents are exposed to a variety of ones to try. Also, as this program is aimed at the parents, a little variety is good so they keep coming back. I also change the books so that they are introduced to a wide variety of titles, authors, and illustrators.

I also try to work in each child's name as much as possible and go around the room doing the song or rhyme for each child (time permitting.) So "Baa Baa Black Sheep" will have a bag of wool for the master, the dame, and little Susie/Timmy/etc down the lane. Or Susie/Timmy etc will be nimble and jump over the candlestick.

The rhymes that I do every week are just personal favorites that tend to go over very well. "Hickory Dickory Dock" is one that I do for all my story times! The actions work well for parent and child, but also just for a child to do by his/herself. I started doing this one when I had children start to age up through different programs and it was one familiar to them when they hit a new setting and format.

I also have a "demonstration baby" (a newborn sized stuffed animal of one of the Wild Things) so I can model rhymes, actions, and reading.

I have a hand-out that lists all the books we read, songs we sang, and the words for all the rhymes (with action cues) that I hand out after the program is done so parents can play along at home. They are also free to check out the books we read, and most do.

Also, after every program, I wipe down the maracas with anti-septic wipes.

It's a great way to bring new parents to the library, or at least to a section of the library they haven't seen in awhile. I've also noticed that kids who start in our baby story time, age up to toddler time, and then age up to our 3-5 year old story times are much better prepared for the older story times and their caregivers are much more active participants.

I hope that's helpful! Tomorrow I'll post my actual story time plan for last week's story time.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Book Club: Stink and the Incredible Super-Galactic Jawbreaker

Stink and the Incredible Super-Galactic Jawbreaker (Book #2)My book discussion group for 9-12 year olds was this week. The book we read was Stink and the Incredible Super-Galactic Jawbreaker by Megan McDonald. I chose it because I thought it was a fun (and funny) book with broad appeal that would be a quicker read. My book club kids are under so much pressure with school testing and tons of homework that I want book club to be FUN.

Of course, I managed to get some HUGE jawbreakers for snack. (Honestly, these were the only jawbreakers the candy store had!) You know a snack is good when it comes with a safety lecture. (And a sandwich bag so they could take it home without getting sticky everywhere. I also had hand wipes for sticky fingers.)

 For prep work I came up with the following list of questions:

What’d you guys think of the book? What was your favorite part?

If you could write a real complaint letter to a company (not just a trick for free stuff!) who would you want write to? Why?

What company do you wish would send you free stuff?

What would you do if you got 21,280 jawbreakers in the mail?

Stink writes his letters by hand and mails them. Do you ever write snail mail letters? To whom?

Stink uses a lot of idioms in this book—there’s a list in the back. Can you think of any more?

What did you think of Stink’s thank you letter to his Grandma? Was it nice?


I also came up with an activity to do if discussion died out before our time was over.

Stink draws comics that show literal interpretations of some idioms. Choose an idiom that Stink didn’t illustrate and draw your own comic!

This teacher guide is also really helpful with ideas, questions, and background info.

There was a concert happening at the same time, but my book club kids decided to go with giant jawbreakers. We never got to the idiom discussion/activity and spent a lot of time comparing progress and seeing what colors were coming up next in our candy. 

All in all it was a very good meeting and we had a lot of fun. Now to prep for next month...

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Welcome!

Welcome to Library Noise, my new blog about library programming for kids.

Many people who know me in the blogosphere knows me from my blog, Biblio File, where I review books. Contrary to popular belief, I'm not a teen services librarian. While my title is "Youth Services" I spend my days on a desk that serves kids birth-12 years/7th grade-ish.

Programming duties are split up evenly in our department. Every week I do a story time for babies (birth-12 months). I also have a monthly book discussion group for kids 9-12, do story time for kids 3-5 every few weeks, plan special one-off programs, and fill in for my coworkers. Plus school visits and field trips and career days...

When I first started programming, one of my coworkers repeatedly told me "Don't reinvent the wheel." I have learned from, borrowed from, and downright stole from many other librarians over the years. It's time I return the favor.

If you find something that you like, please use it!

If you're confused about actions to something or a melody, just ask! 

Now, let's make some noise!